Sunday, February 19, 2012

Abstinence from the Needle

Many of you would not like the idea of interrupting their needlework for months. I did, because I needed a change. I needed to paint. And I don't know where to put all the stuff I produce! I give away some of it, but some things just don't seem to find a new owner. And when projects take too long, they start boring me beyond all bearing. Sometimes, the cure is to hide a piece from myself, then, after years, dig it out again and see it as a new project. You might remember my Josef Albers project. The next one will be a free variation on his motif, but more variegated in color. They might remind of Mondrian's Victory Boogie Woogie. There is no plan or sketch -- I just let it grow. This is a risk for the composition of the finished thing, but I cannot work in a different way. The colors will tell me where they would like to sit and in what company. Stitching is quite fast, I work with both hands. I never make sketches. My inner commander seems to think that a sketch does the task, so once it is done, no more work is needed.

Update shows the colors I picked for the project.

5 comments:

Dream on the wave said...

I like it how you let your instinct guide you and I totally recognize it when you leave unfinished pieces for a while and get back to them. I do it all the time. When the time is right, it will get finished...whenever that is.
Many greetings, Frieda

deanna7trees said...

i, too, have lots of 'stuff' that i've produced that do not have a home. i don't really think anyone would buy it and do not feel right about giving things to people unless i'm sure they will like it and enjoy it. i don't want to give things away that will just sit in someone elses storage.

Yael said...

Wow - you know Eva, I see this piece and I just wont to grab a needle and do some rows!... :-)

jude said...

are you familiar with the weavings of Annie Albers?

Diane said...

I am already excited about this piece. can't wait to see more. I so understand about coming back to something later and seeing it with new eyes. Sometimes a break is all that is needed.